Kibale National Park is located in the districts of Kabarole and Kamwenge, approximately 320 kilometres (200 mi), by road, west of Kampala, Uganda’s capital and largest city.
It is 766 km2 in size and is located between 1100 and 1600 meters inelevation. Despite encompassing primarily moist evergreen forest, it contains a diverse array of landscapes. Kibale is one of the last remaining expanses to contain both lowland and mountain forests.

Kibale National Forest has one of the highest diversity and concentration of primates in Africa. It is home to a large number of endangered chimpanzees, as well as the red colobus monkey and the rare L’Hoest’s monkey.

The park is also home to over 325 species of birds, 4 wild felids, various species of primates, a total of at least 60 other species of mammals and over 250 tree species. The predominant ecosystem in Kibale is moist evergreen and semi-deciduous forest.

There are 13 species of primates in Kibale National Park. The park protects several well-studied habituated communities of Common Chimpanzee, as well as several species of Central African monkey including the Uganda Mangabey (Lophocebus ugandae), the Ugandan Red Colobus (Procolobus tephrosceles)and the L’Hoest’s Monkey. Other primates that are found in the park include the black (Colobus satanas) colobus and the blue monkey (Cercopithecus mitis). The park’s population of elephants travels between the park and Queen Elizabeth National Park. Other terrestrial mammals that are found within Kibale National Park include red and blue duikers, bushpigs, warthogs, and buffalo.

The carnivores that are present include leopards, bushpigs, three species of duiker and two species of otter. In addition, lions visit the park on occasion.
Bird life is also prolific. The park boasts 325 sited species of birds, including the olive long-tailed cuckoo, Western Green tinkerbird, two species of pittas (African and Green-breasted) and the African Grey Parrot. The ground thrush (Turdus kibalensis) is endemic to Kibale National Park.

Kibale adjoins Queen Elizabeth National Park to the south to create a 180km-long corridor for wildlife between Ishasha, the remote southern sector of Queen Elizabeth National Park, and Sebitoli in the north of Kibale National Park.

Guided walks can be arranged and take 2-3 hours.

 Interested in visiting Kibale Forest? Check out our example packages or contact us directly.